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Child Protection and Safeguarding

At St. Martin’s CE VA Primary School, we recognise that all pupils are our responsibility and concern. We want to work in partnership with families, and discuss with them any concerns we may have, or that they may have. It is a priority to inform and involve families at every stage in their child’s time at the school. However, since our first priority is the welfare of children, there may be rare occasions when our concern about a child means that we have to consult other agencies, even before we contact the child’s family. The East Riding Safeguarding Children Partnership (ERSCP) has laid down the procedures we follow, and the school has adopted a Strategic Safeguarding and Child Protection Policy in line with this for the safety of all. 

 

If you want to know more about our procedures or the policy, please speak to Mrs Juliet Robinson, the Headteacher and Designated Safeguarding Lead.  The Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead is Mrs Jean Atkinson.  Mrs Rebecca Thomas is the Governor with responsibility for Safeguarding and Child Protection.

Strategic Child Protection and Safeguarding Policy

Mrs Juliet Robinson is the Designated Safeguarding Lead

Mrs Juliet Robinson is the Designated Safeguarding Lead 1

Mrs Jean Atkinson is the Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead

Mrs Jean Atkinson is the Deputy Designated Safeguarding Lead 1

Mrs Rebecca Thomas is our Governor with responsibility for Child Protection and Safeguarding.

Mrs Rebecca Thomas is our Governor with responsibility for Child Protection and Safeguarding. 1

Operation Encompass

 

As part of our commitment to safeguarding, St Martin’s is part of Operation Encompass.  Operation Encompass is the reporting of incidents to school staff by police.  This happens when a child or young person at the school has been involved or exposed to a domestic abuse incident the previous evening.  Reporting takes place before 9am on a school day.

 

The information is given to a school’s Key Adult to enable support to be given dependent on the needs and wishes of the child.

 

‘Witnessing domestic abuse is as harmful to a child as being directly on the receiving end of the less serious variety of physical violence since there is no emotional refuge for a child who has one care giver a threat and the other frightened’ (Building Great Britons page 8 2015).

 

Professionals realise that being exposed to domestic abuse is classed as an adverse childhood experience and that the more adverse childhood experiences a child has the greater the negative impact upon their mental and physical health and well-being now and in the future.

 

 

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